How to Break in Hockey Goalie Gloves

What We Cover:
Hot Water Method
Drying
Final Touches
Related Resources

Hot Water Method

If you’re looking to expedite the break in process for your new glove, your best bet is to start at home. Take your new glove, turn on your tap water as hot as possible and run the water on the outside of your glove’s palm. The point of this is to slowly heat up the high-density foams that make up the break and outside region of your glove’s palm. After a minute’s passed, flip the glove and let the water run through the cuff and interior lining for the same duration.

Drying

While you may think your work is finished, the real break in process begins during the glove’s drying phase. It’s imperative that you get the glove to stay in the exact shape and pocket formation you prefer before placing it out to dry. Looking for a loose, open pocket? Put some weights on the thumb and finger region of the pocket to ensure it stays open as it dries. More of a pancake-type glove tendy? Throw one or two pucks in where you want to form your pocket and either strap some ties over it or place it under a weight that will keep it in form. Whichever method you prefer, keep your glove drying for at least 6 to 8 hours.

Final Touches

No good break in process is complete without putting a little extra elbow grease in. Make sure to snap your glove open and close as much as you can, wear it around the house, throw pucks in it, sleep on it, and everything in between.

Related Resources

Buying Guide Hockey Goalie Glove
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